M-22 House by Michael Fitzhugh


http://www.caandesign.com/m-22-house-by-michael-fitzhugh/

M-22 House by Michael Fitzhugh

Architects: Michael Fitzhugh
Location: Michigan, USA
Year: 2013
Photo courtesy: Michael Fitzhugh
Description:

This cutting edge living arrangement sits along the highest point of a tall edge sitting above West Grand Traverse Bay in Northern Michigan. The configuration of the house reproduces the feeling of disclosure felt while rising the back of the edge to the perspectives uncovered once at the top. The materials and spaces were motivated by the components; water, wind, earth and fire.

M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-01

From every room the materials, light and an in number association with the site is felt. The house additionally brags an inventive geothermal warming and cooling frameworks alongside its own hydroelectric force generator which utilizes water, geothermal water and gravity to produce power for the house. A blend of solid, steel, composite siding and expansive glass openings supplement the perfect type of the house’s outside.

M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-02

This is a genuinely one of a kind structure and is a model for future manageable configuration and development methods.

M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-03M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-04M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-05M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-06M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-07M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-08M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-09M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-10M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-11M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-12M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-13M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-14M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-15M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-16M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-17M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-18M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-19M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-20M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-21M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-22M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-23M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-24M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-25M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-26M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-27M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-28M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-29M-22-House-by-Michael-Fitzhugh-30

Thank you for reading this article!

 

Yoga for Inner Peace: 12 Poses to Release Sadness


http://www.yogajournal.com/slideshow/yoga-for-inner-peace-12-poses-to-release-sadness/

Yoga for Inner Peace: 12 Poses to Release Sadness

Colleen Saidman Yee performs Modified Child’s Pose.

Join Colleen Saidman Yee’s half-day workshop, Yoga for Inner Peace, at Yoga Journal LIVE Florida on Saturday, Nov. 12. Get your ticket now! On the West Coast? Practice with her at YJ LIVE San Francisco, Jan. 13-16.

In Yoga Journal’s upcoming online course, Yoga for Inner Peace, Colleen Saidman Yee—acclaimed yoga teacher, fashion model, and the wife of yogi Rodney Yee—offers 3 yogic practices a week for 12 weeks to transform your body, mind, and heart and support YOU in your personal journey toward inner peace. Here, she discusses the importance of letting yourself feel sad, and demonstrates a sequence to release grief and other festering emotions.

The Importance of Feeling Sad

Roshi Joan Halifax, who has spent the last 45 years working with death and dying, says one of the biggest problems in our society today is unexpressed grief. We are so afraid to feel sad that we cover it up. Soon, we start to believe the masks that we put on, and who we really are gets buried deeper and deeper. The body knows what’s real and what isn’t. So if we continue to live this façade, human-to-human connection gets confusing, and we end up feeling isolated and misunderstood, rather than content and peaceful.

Mr. Iyengar said that if you don’t want your world to change, don’t step on your mat. It becomes so much more difficult to BS yourself and others once the practice is in your bones. You know when you’re lying, and it feels horrible. Again, the body knows more than the brain, and a yoga practice fosters that intimacy and ability to listen to the body. It becomes more and more difficult to ignore or cover up emotions. How many times have you rested in Savasana and cried for seemingly no reason? Maybe it’s relief from a lifetime of feeling the need to shut down.

Ramanand Patel (my husband, Rodney Yee’s teacher) was just here teaching at my Yoga Shanti studio in Sag Harbor, New York. He talked about the importance of release, and said that the two main ways to let out festering emotions are laughing and crying. He pointed out that over our four days together, I would make a joke when things got sentimental or sad. On the last day, he looked me in the eyes and said, “You need to cry more." Because I’ve been in front of the camera since I was 19 as a model, I learned how to shut down the tears. My eyes swell when I cry, and that makes my clients unhappy. So Ramanand nailed me and gave me permission to let go of my stoic façade. I took it on, and now I cry pretty much every day. I don’t look for things to cry about, but I no longer shut down the impulse (I’m watching the Olympics with tears streaming down my face as I write this). My tears are tears of sadness, empathy, and joy. My face and shoulder muscles have softened, and I’m better able to sit with not only my sadness, but other people’s sadness. Taking off my mask has given others permission to do the same. From here, real communication and connection can thrive.

When we conceal our emotions, we get stuck in protection mode. The following sequence begins with Sun Salutations to shake up the body in all directions in order to clear out the hardness. I recommend doing these postures without being rigid, even if that means not going all the way into each pose. Match your breath to the movements.

Slideshow: 12 Poses to Release Sadness

YOU WILL NEED A block and a blanket.

  • Upward Salute

    Upward Salute

    Urdhva Hastasana

    Stand in Mountain Pose at the front of your mat. Inhale, reaching your arms overhead to Upward Salute.

  • Standing Forward Bend

    Standing Forward Bend

    Uttanasana

    Exhale, folding forward into a Standing Forward Bend.

  • High Lunge

    High Lunge

    Inhale, step one foot back to a High Lunge.

  • Downward-Facing Dog

    Downward-Facing Dog

    Adho Mukha Svanasana

    Exhale, pull your hips back to Downward-Facing Dog.

  • Plank

    Plank

    Inhale, come forward to Plank position.

  • Chaturanga

    Chaturanga

    Exhale, bend your elbows to Chaturanga.

  • Upward-Facing Dog

    Upward-Facing Dog

    Inhale to Upward-Facing Dog by rolling to the tops of your feet; lift your thighs and move your chest, neck, and head forward and up. Then, pull your hips back to Downward-Facing Dog. Step or jump forward and repeat 3 to 5 times from Mountain Pose, alternating the leading foot.

  • Modified Child’s Pose

    Modified Child’s Pose

    Modified Balasana

    From Downward-Facing Dog, take your knees to the floor and rest your hips on your heels, with your arms alongside the body for more of a turning inward. You’re safe in this pose, not exposed. It’s important to open up slowly. When one is sad and in protection mode, you don’t want to use any force to open them up. You meet them where they are.

  • Constructive rest

    Constructive rest

    Lie down on your back, bend your knees, and rest them against each other. Take your arms across your body as if you were giving yourself a hug. This is considered a neutral pose, and I’m using it here as a transition into a backbend. Lying on your back, you’re a little more exposed, but the pose doesn’t have the vulnerability of a backbend, and you have your arms crossed in front of your body for extra comfort and protection.

  • Restorative Fish Pose

    Restorative Fish Pose

    Restorative Matsyasana

    Roll up a blanket and place it horizontally across your mat. Lie down on the blanket so that it’s right under your shoulder blades. Your legs are straight and parallel as you press them into the ground. This is a restorative backbend, so you can relax with the opening it creates. This may let your sadness come to the surface as your whole front body is exposed and your heart is open. Allow yourself that tenderness.

  • Bridge Pose with block under sacrum

    Bridge Pose with block under sacrum

    Setu Bandha Sarvangasana with a block under your sacrum

    While lying on your back, bend your knees, lift your hips, and place a block at the lowest height under your sacrum. Let your belly rest completely. Bend your elbows and press the upper arms into the ground to keep the chest buoyant. This keeps the opening of the backbend, and creates Jalandhara Bandha, so there is a turning in, cooling, listening, and reflective quality.

  • Easy Pose

    Easy Pose

    Sukhasana

    Come to sit in Easy Pose and notice how you feel. If you’d like, bring your hands into Prayer. Notice any hardness in the body. Sit with it. Go inside it — there may be anger right under the surface. Breathe into that, and sit with it. Dig deeper, you may come across fear. Stay. Don’t bolt. Fear turns to sadness. Feel deeply. Breathe into that. Hold your sadness. Keep going deeper. Each layer becomes more tender, until you open into blue sky. Laugh. Cry. Feel. Love. Connect.

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The UN spent over $17bn in 2015. These countries were its biggest suppliers


中國永遠是敬陪末座~~~

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/08/the-un-spent-over-17bn-in-2015-which-countries-are-its-biggest-suppliers?utm_content=buffera3312&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

The UN spent over $17bn in 2015. These countries were its biggest suppliers

Tourists walk past the United Nations Headquarters in New York. At left is the U.N. General Assembly building and at right is the U.N. Secretariat building

The UN spent $17.6 billion on its operations last year.
Image: REUTERS/Mike Segar
Written by
Rachel HallettFormative Content
Published
Thursday 18 August 2016
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India supplied over $1.2 billion in goods and services to the United Nations last year, surpassed only by the United States.

According to the Annual Statistical Report on United Nations Procurement, the UN spent $17.6 billion on its operational activities in 2015 – a rise of $400m on the year before.

So which nations supply the most to the organization’s operations, projects and programs? And what does the organization buy from them?

The UN’s biggest suppliers

The report shows that the US was the UN’s largest supplier in 2015, with goods and services worth over $1.6 billion.

 Which countries contribute the most to the UN?

Image: Statista

After India’s $1.2 billion in goods and services came the UAE’s $805 million.

Which countries have increased contributions the most?

The position of the US and European countries in the top 10 is not new. What is new is the amount of procurement from transitioning, developing and less developed countries.

Among the nations with the largest increases between 2005 and 2015 are Kenya, Lebanon, Afghanistan, Turkey and Ethiopia.

Countries with largest increases in procurement volume between 2005 and 2015

Image: UN

What does the UN buy?

The United Nations mainly buys products and services from developed countries.

In less developed countries, more services than products are purchased by the UN as well as raw materials.

UN procurement of goods and services from developed countries, countries with economies in transition and developing countries.

Image: UN

Goods and services fall into a wide variety of categories that the UN groups into 13 sectors. These are: health; transport; consultancy; administration and operation; construction and engineering; food and farming; humanitarian aid; peace and security; climate action; energy; education; clean water and sanitation; and other goods and services.

Health, with a 23% share of overall procurement last year, remains the largest sector. This includes procurement of pharmaceuticals, healthcare services and medical and laboratory equipment.

Have you read?

Written by

Rachel Hallett, Formative Content

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

 

The Safest Approach to Great Glutes


http://www.yogajournal.com/article/practice-section/great-glutes/

The Safest Approach to Great Glutes

It’s good to have strong glutes, but if they’re over developed with short, tight muscles, you’re likely to face a multitude of difficulties.

In everyday life, over developed glute discomfort can include sciatic nerve problems, low-back pain, and even knee trouble. That’s because tight buttock muscles limit the range of motion of the hips, leaving the low back and knees to compensate. Tightness in the posterior hips can also pull the knee out of alignment, thereby contributing to knee tendonitis and even arthritis. In yoga, you’re likely to come up against frustrating flexibility challenges, particularly in forward bends and seated twists.

Most often, the buttock muscles get overly tight when you spend a lot of time sitting, especially with crossed legs or ankles. Activities like cycling and running can also contribute. Whatever the cause, the solution is to do stretches and yoga poses that lengthen these muscles and teach them to relax. If you can squeeze in some butt stretches a few times a week, not only will your low back and knees be happier, but you’ll be rewarded with greater ease in your practice.

Your Humps (aka Gluteus Maximus)

So what are these mysterious, hard-gripping, pose-disrupting muscles? The buttock muscles can be divided into two layers: the more superficial one is the gluteus maximus, which, when well developed, forms the rounded shape of the buttocks. It originates on the sacrum at the base of the spine and nearby pelvis, and then runs diagonally down and across the buttocks to insert on the outer upper femur (thighbone). When it contracts, it extends the hip, which pulls the femur into line with the torso. For example, the gluteus maximus contracts when you stand up.

In yoga, the gluteus maximus helps perform a similar job in partnership with the hamstrings when you move from a standing forward bend to standing upright. The gluteus maximus is also a strong external rotator of the hip, which, when you’re standing, turns the knees outward. The second and deeper layer of buttock muscles is made up of the six deep rotators. The piriformis is the best known, but this group also includes the internal and external obturators, the superior and inferior gemelli, and the quadratus femoris. They originate on the sacrum and the ischial tuberosities (sitting bones), and then run diagonally in a fan shape across the deep buttocks to insert on the back of the upper femur on the greater trochanter.

Also see Glute Anatomy to Improve Your Yoga Practice

Troubleshooting: The Glutes

There is good reason to develop strong rotators. They are important for moving and positioning the hip joint in daily activities and in standing poses. The primary action of the deep rotators is external rotation, and, like all muscles that are deep and close to a joint, they help to stabilize that joint. However, the piriformis is probably best known as a troublemaker, as it contracts and even spasms in association with low-back pain and may press on the sciatic nerve. This pressure can cause painful leg symptoms, including the shooting pain, deep aching, or even hot or icy sensations commonly called sciatica.

The gluteus maximus and the deep hip rotators are also responsible for horizontal abduction. This is different from standard hip abduction, which is what you do when you stand with your back against a wall and lift your leg straight out to the side. To experience horizontal abduction, stand on your right leg with your left hip and knee flexed up to 90 degrees each, as they’d be if you were sitting in a chair. Open the left leg out to the side so the left knee points to the left. This is the action that you’d perform to align the left knee over the left foot in Virabhadrasana II (Warrior Pose II) and in Parsvakonasana (Side Angle Pose).

But when both layers of buttock muscles are short and tight, they will pull the hip into external rotation, horizontal abduction, and extension, which means that internal rotation, horizontal adduction, and flexion will be limited. And that, in a nutshell, is what causes problems in forward bends and twists. When you’re sitting on the floor, tight buttock muscles, often in partnership with tight hamstrings, tend to tilt the pelvis backward, causing a slumped spine and reversing the normal lumbar curve, which can contribute to low-back strain and even disk injuries. This tendency to tilt the pelvis backward affects all sitting poses, including twists, cross-legged poses, and forward bends. In all these floor poses, the struggle to sit up can be eased by sitting on one or more folded blankets until you’ve had time to stretch the buttocks and hamstrings.

How to Stretch Out the Glutes

So how exactly do you go about loosening these troublemakers? Seated twists such as Ardha Matsyendrasana (Half Lord of the Fishes Pose) and its variations can be excellent tools. To try it, sit with your left leg bent on the floor, either sitting on the foot in the traditional pose or, if that’s not possible for you, placing the left foot just to the outside of the right hip. Then cross the right leg over the left, with the sole of the right foot on the floor outside the left thigh. Sit tall (on folded blankets as needed) and rotate your spine to the right as you draw the right knee toward the left armpit. Wrap the left elbow around the right knee, or even hook it on the outside of the knee, and use that leverage to pull the left chest up and toward the knee. In this position, the right hip is flexed, relatively internally rotated, and drawn in toward the midline rather than horizontally abducting. This pose isolates the posterior hip muscles, and they have no choice but to lengthen and to stretch. Repeat on the other side, crossing the right leg with the left foot.

You can also practice a couple of variations lying on your back. When you work supine, it’s easier to stay in the pose without struggling to sit upright, so you can experience a long, deep, relaxing stretch. Start by lying on your back and draw the right knee up and across your body until you feel the stretch in the back of the right hip. Or, from the start position, bend your knees and cross your right knee over the left. Lift the left foot off the ground and hold the left knee with your right hand, pulling it toward your chest. To deepen the stretch, hold the right ankle with your left hand and pull gently until you stretch the back of the right hip. Repeat the stretch on the other side.

Exercise Caution In Hip Stretches

Move gradually into every hip stretch, listening to your body, because you can strain adjacent joints if you move too aggressively. The hip is a strong joint, and when it has moved as far as it can, continued pushing can pull the next joints above (the low-back and sacroiliac joints) and the next ones below (the knee and ankle) into directions that aren’t beneficial. This can happen in any stretch, including classical poses like Padmasana (Lotus Pose). And uncomfortable pressure or pain in the front of the hip when you pull the thigh up and across your torso doesn’t indicate a productive stretch; it means there’s compression on the tendons, ligaments, and other soft tissues that cross the front of the hip. Put a rolled hand towel in your groin—between the femur and lower abdomen—to open up the space, or move on to a different variation.

Practice your hip stretches two to three times each week; be sure to stay for a minute or two to breathe and relax into each one. Not only will the buttock muscles let go and lengthen but you’ll also have a chance to release any tendencies to keep a hard grip on your life.

Teachers, explore the newly improved TeachersPlus. Protect yourself with liability insurance and build your business with a dozen valuable benefits, including a free teacher profile on our national directory. Plus, find answers to all your questions about teaching.

ABOUT OUR EXPERT
Julie Gudmestad is a physical therapist and Iyengar Yoga teacher in Portland, Oregon. She regrets that she cannot respond to requests for personal health advice.


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10 economies leading the world on trade


https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/11/top-10-global-enabling-trade-report-2016?utm_content=buffer844be&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

10 economies leading the world on trade

A worker walks in a shipping container area at the Port of Shanghai April 10, 2012. China returned to an export-led trade surplus of $5.35 billion in March, heralding the prospect that a rebound in the global economy is lifting overseas orders just in time to compensate for a slowdown in domestic demand. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT) - RTR30JOK

European countries top the rankings in this year’s Global Enabling Trade Report
Image: REUTERS/Aly Song
Written by
Andrea WilligeFormative Content
Published
Wednesday 30 November 2016
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Asian countries are outpacing many European nations in the World Economic Forum’s new international ranking of trade-friendly economies.

Singapore takes the top spot in the Global Enabling Trade Report 2016, published today by the World Economic Forum and the Global Alliance for Trade Facilitation.

The report assesses the extent to which economies have institutions, policies, infrastructures and services which facilitate the free flow of goods.

While the European Union and the United States are deemed to be becoming less open for trade, the ASEAN area – which includes nations such as Singapore, Indonesia and the Philippines – is now more accessible than these traditional heavyweights.

The report attributes ASEAN’s rise as an economic power to the region’s greater integration into the global economy.

The report’s top 10 is, however, still dominated by European countries.

 Top ten economies at enabling trade across borders

Movers, shakers and the rest

Singapore tops the Enabling Trade Index (ETI) for the fifth time. Its domestic market is rated as one of the world’s most open, with 99.7% of goods entering duty free. The report highlights its border processes as the best in the world – while failings in border administration are a stumbling block in other economies.

The country’s transport services and overall socio-political operating environment, including highly efficient and trusted public institutions, also contribute to its overall trade leadership.

Europe and North America remain the highest performing regions on enabling trade, but have witnessed a slowdown since 2014. Most progress in Europe was made by emerging players: for instance, Lithuania moved up eight places to 29th and Serbia made up a 18 places to reach 64th.

Among the advanced economies, Switzerland – which landed just outside the top 10 – and the US provide the worst access to domestic and foreign markets, respectively.

Domestic market access and GDP

Global enabling trade report domestic market access GDP

The most improved region overall was sub-Saharan Africa, which had made significant advances in terms of market access and information and communications technology adoption.

While the ASEAN members were singled out for being the most “open for business" in terms of market access, South Asia was highlighted as the most closed region in the world, having increased tariffs on imported products by nearly 1%, to 16.7%.

Prevailing barriers

The report also says that high barriers to entry and prohibitive trade costs are still preventing millions of people around the world from benefiting from international trade. This is particularly true of rural communities, young people and women, and especially in larger emerging markets.

The top 10 countries for trade only account for 3% of the world population, while more than half live in countries ranked in the bottom half of the ETI. China as one of the most populous countries in the world is the most prominent example, ranking only 61st for trade.

Written by

Andrea Willige, Formative Content

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

 

10 Creative Ways to Use Props in Your Practice


http://www.yogajournal.com/slideshow/10-creative-ways-use-yoga-props-practice/

10 Creative Ways to Use Props in Your Practice

I’m a huge advocate of props. Not only do they help you find more space and stability in your poses, they’re also great teaching tools with endless uses if you get creative. I love taking workshops and discovering new ways to use blocks, blankets, walls and straps, and incorporating them into my classes. I find the more time we dedicate to playing with props, the more likely my students are to continue using them.

10 New Ways to Use Yoga Props

  • Overhead Shoulder Flossing with a Strap

    Overhead Shoulder Flossing with a Strap

    There are many neat ways to use a strap for shoulder openers, however, I’m obsessed with this simple overhead shoulder-flossing technique. Clients and students love it as well. It’s one I would prescribe daily to just about anyone. It’s ideal for lengthening out and opening up after a long day of sitting.

    Stand in Tadasana holding onto the strap in front of you down by your waist. Widen your hands apart until you’re gripping the strap wider than your shoulders. Inhale and take the strap up overhead; exhale and bring the strap behind you (if your shoulders won’t let you take the strap back, simply widen your grip). Inhale and bring the strap back overhead; exhale and lower it in front of you. Repeat 5 times.

    See also Touch with Skill: 4 Essential Steps for Hands-On Assists

  • Sun Salutations with Blocks

    Sun Salutations with Blocks

    Experience freedom as you move through Surya Namaskar A and B by practicing with your hands on blocks (gripping required).

    Essentially lengthening your arms, the extra lift through your armpits allows you to step back from Uttanasana and forward from Downward-Facing Dog more freely. It also allows the transition from Chaturanga Dandasana to Upward-Facing Dog to take place without coming down to the floor. Plus, having students practice Down Dog with their hands on blocks is a great way to teach them how to press down through the palms and lift the underside of their arms and shoulders. Not to mention, jumping forward, back and through with your hands on blocks is a lot of fun, too!

    See also Mary Beth LaRue’s 10 Favorite Places to Find Creative Inspiration

  • Wide-Legged Forward Fold with a Blanket

    Wide-Legged Forward Fold with a Blanket

    Designed to teach students how to hug their legs toward the midline and engage their lower bandhas by lifting up through the pelvic floor, this move will strengthen your inner thighs and core. It’s also fantastic prep work for those on the quest to conquer the straddle press Handstand.

    Fold a blanket in half lengthwise and place it on the floor alongside the long edge of your mat. Stand on the blanket with your feet wide apart, bend your knees, and forward fold, placing your hands on the mat (or a pair of blocks). Inhale, straighten your arms and lengthen your spine, coming to a flat back and curling your sternum forward. Exhale, press down through your palms, round your spine and draw your legs and feet together. Next inhale, glide your feet apart and lengthen your spine. Continue to repeat for 10 breaths, drawing the legs together on your exhale and pressing them apart on your inhale.

    See also 4 Ways to Modify Chair Pose

  • Supported Warrior III with a Strap

    Supported Warrior III with a Strap

    Hate Warrior III Pose? You’re going to love this supported variation. The dynamic action of pushing through the lifted heel while also pulling through the hands, engaging the shoulder blades on upper back, feels incredibly stable and allows you to work on engaging the core and lengthening out the spine.

    Holding onto each end of the strap, stand in Tadasana with the strap behind you. Step one heel on the strap. Inhale, lift up through your sternum and, with straight arms, engage your shoulder blades onto your upper back. Continue to press your heel down into the strap and pull your hands, lengthening the sides of your body, as you slowly begin to tilt forward and lift your leg up into Warrior III.

    See also Stoke Your Inner Warrior with Sadie Nardini’s Solar Plexus Power Flow

  • Crow on a Block

    Crow on a Block

    Crow Pose requires a decent amount of strength for execution. But if your hips won’t allow you to get your knees above the height of your elbows, then it’s nearly impossible to take flight in the arm balance. Give your hips a lift by perching your Crow on a block.

    Place a block flat in the middle of your mat. Stand with your feet on the block and squat down, placing your hands on the mat in front of you and opening your knees around your arms. Squeeze your inner knees around your upper arms and lift your hips up higher. Keep squeezing your inner thighs together, draw up through your core, and strongly grip the floor as you take your gaze slightly forward. Play with taking one foot off the block at a time, allowing yourself to tilt forward and find your Crow Pose.

    Already an expert at Crow? Instead, try holding the block between the inner edges of your feet and bring it toward your sitting bones in the arm balance.

    See also Challenge Pose: 4 Steps To Side Crow (Parsva Bakasana)

  • Wheel on Blocks

    Wheel on Blocks

    Students with tighter shoulders, who struggle to press up into Urdhva Dhanurasana from the floor can find more space in the full backbend with their hands on blocks at the wall. I also find it’s the best way to teach beginners how to approach and work toward the pose.

    Tightly wedge a pair of blocks (shoulder-width apart) into the base of the wall and the floor and lie on your back with your head between the blocks at the wall, knees bent and feet flat. Place your palms on the top side of the block by your ears with the heel of your hand and your fingers wrapped around the front side. Draw your elbows toward one another and firmly press your palms down into the blocks as you lift your body away from the floor and place the top of your head lightly on the mat. Point your elbows at the wall and draw your shoulder blades onto your back. Push down through your feet and the palms of your hands and straighten your arms, lifting the crown of your head off the floor and coming up into Full Wheel Pose.

    See also 5 Poses to Try With a Dharma Yoga Wheel

  • Bow Pose on a Bolster

    Bow Pose on a Bolster

    Most students have a love/hate (as in despise) relationship with Bow Pose. You can nearly feel the room collectively groan with the teacher says bend both knees and reach back for both ankles (and the relief when I only have my students do one). It’s a difficult pose, requiring open shoulders and thighs as well as a ton of spinal extension. And it doesn’t always feel so great in the low back.

    I fell in love with this variation of supported Dhanurasana. Having the bolster beneath your low abdomen and frontal hip points rocks you back just enough to keep your knees on the floor as your kick back with your heels and lengthen your sternum forward and up. You really get to experience the opening of the chest without the pinch in your low back that’s so common in this pose.

    See also Target Tight + Weak Spots: A New Way To Do Bow Pose

  • Balancing Postures on a Block

    Balancing Postures on a Block

    Step up your concentration game and put your balance to the test by standing on a block as you transition through even the most basic balancing poses. Rather than collapsing out of balancing postures as we often do once they’re over, standing on a block forces you to remain present and focused as you move in and out of the poses and from left to right side. It’ll also strengthen your arches and ankles, which may be sore the next day.

    Place a block flat and lengthwise on your mat (hint: the denser the block the easier it is). Start by standing with both feet on the block and deepen your breath. When you’re ready, wiggle one foot to the middle of the block and draw the opposite knee into your chest. From there you can practice any number of one-legged standing poses, including Tree Pose, Eagle Pose, Extended Hand-To-Big-Toe Pose and Warrior III Pose.

    For an extra challenge: Place a second block on the crown of your head!

    See also Skillful Sequencing: Plan a Chakra-Balancing Yoga Class

  • Standing Poses with Back Foot on a Blanket

    Standing Poses with Back Foot on a Blanket

    One of the key actions in all standing poses is drawing in to the midline and engaging the legs toward one another. Finding and engaging the inner thigh muscles of your back leg can be tough to do, though. Placing your back foot on a sliding blanket in Warrior II Pose will immediately teach you how to hug the back leg forward.

    Fold your mat in half and place a neatly folded blanket flat on the floor at the rounded edge. Come to stand with your right foot on the mat (toes pointed forward) and your left foot on the blanket in preparation for Warrior II. With your hands on your hips, slowly begin to bend your right knee and slide your left foot back away from the mat until you are in a Warrior II stance. Hold for a few rounds of breath.

    See also Mindful Anger Management: Deepen Your Understanding of the Emotion

  • Scorpion Pose Over a Chair

    Scorpion Pose Over a Chair

    While there aren’t generally folding chairs lying around most studios (check the closets), they can be fantastic props and teaching tools as shown here in Scorpion Pose.

    Place the short edge of your mat at the wall and the chair on the mat with its back against the wall. Come down to all fours and place your elbows on mat with your forearms parallel (you can either grab the front legs of the chair or place your palms flat spreading your fingers with the front feet between your index finger and thumb). Lift your knees, coming into Dolphin Pose. When you’re ready, kick both feet up to the wall. The chair then offers you different platforms to lower your feet onto as you practice the deep backbend in different stages (first the top of the chair then the seat). The chair’s great for practicing the difficult inversion and working on its various elements.

    See also Scorpion Pose: Replacement for Headstand if You Have a Neck Injury

  • About Our Writer

    About Our Writer

    Meagan McCrary is a 500 E-RYT and writer with a passion for helping people find more comfort, clarity, compassion, and joy on the mat and in life. She’s the author of Pick Your Yoga Practice: Exploring and Understanding Different Styles of Yoga, an encyclopedia of modern yoga systems, as well as a contributor at yogajournal.com. Living in Los Angeles, Meagan teaches at various Equinox Sports Clubs and at Wanderlust Hollywood. Find her on:

    http://www.meaganmccrary.com
     Twitter: @MeaganMcCrary
     Instagram: @msmeagan
     Facebook: @meaganmccraryyoga

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[ 4K Ultra HD ] 浅草「歳の市・羽子板市」TOKYO ASAKUSA ’Toshino-ichi & Hagoita-ichi’ (3-axis gimbal )


Got Tight Quads? Yes, You Can Still Enjoy Supta Virasana


http://www.yogajournal.com/article/practice-section/hero-s-journey-2/

Got Tight Quads? Yes, You Can Still Enjoy Supta Virasana

Don’t let tight quadriceps keep you from one of yoga’s most relaxing poses: Supta Virasana.

Supta Virasana (Reclining Hero Pose) is a passive backbend and a wonderful chest opener that’s extremely relaxing and restorative. It’s the perfect antidote to an overstressed life—as long as your knees and lower back aren’t screaming in agony. Why do some students experience such pleasure and others pure pain in this pose?

It’s likely that it has to do with the length in the muscles of your front body. Supta Virasana is a classic front-opening pose. As you sit between your heels, it stretches the fronts of your ankles and lower legs. As you lie back, your quadriceps and abdominal muscles lengthen and open. Extending your arms overhead adds a shoulder and chest stretch. All in all, it’s a wonderful position for spacious, relaxed breathing.

See also Keep the Knees Healthy in Virasana

But sometimes your lower body doesn’t cooperate. If you have knee and back pain in this pose, the culprit is often tightness in your quadriceps, specifically the rectus femoris (RF). I recommend working on this muscle if you’re having difficulties in Supta Virasana. One caveat, though: If you have persistent pain in your lower back or knees in the pose, consult your health care provider to rule out structural problems or injuries, then find an experienced teacher for guidance. If you’re uncomfortable doing the pose even with skilled supervision, substitute another supported backbend, like Supta Baddha Konasana (Reclining Bound Angle Pose) or supported Setu Bandha Sarvangasana (Bridge Pose).

The RF is one of the four muscles that form the quadriceps on the front of the thigh. It sits directly under the skin, running right down the center of the thigh between hip and knee. This muscle originates on the front pelvis above the hip socket, and then crosses the front of the hip to join the other three quads: the vastus lateralis, v. intermedius, and v. medialis. The three vastus muscles originate on the femur, and all four quadriceps converge into a common tendon, which attaches to the kneecap. This tendon then extends down past the knee, becoming the patellar ligament, which inserts on the shinbone. All four muscles contract to extend (straighten) the knee. Because RF crosses the hip, it also acts to flex (bend) the hip when the thigh and torso are pulled toward each other.

See also Ask the Expert: How Can I Protect Myself in Backbends?

Lengthening and Strengthening the Rectus Femoris

The joint a muscle is connected to must oppose the lengthening action in order to stretch any muscle. In this case, because the quads extend the knee when they contract, you must flex the knee to lengthen and stretch them. And since RF is connected to two joint muscles, you have to position both joints properly to fully lengthen it. That means you’ll have to simultaneously flex (bend) the knee and extend the hip (bring the thighbone in line with or behind the torso). This position describes Supta Virasana perfectly: When you sit between your heels, your knees are deeply flexed, and when you lay your torso back on the floor, your hips are fully extended.

The trouble usually arises when RF doesn’t lengthen enough to allow the knees and hips their full range of motion. Often the muscle is too short and hasn’t been stretched enough. Perhaps it’s been worked hard or you’ve spent long periods sitting in a chair with hips and knees both at 90-degree angles. And if you’re like most yoga practitioners, you probably spend much more time stretching the backs of your thighs than the fronts. In any case, if all four quadriceps are short and tight, they will prevent the knee from flexing fully, and you will have trouble lowering your hips toward your heels—never mind sitting between them.

See also Resolving Back Pain: Sacroiliac Joint

Trying to force your pelvis down between your heels before the quads are long enough is counterproductive and painful, and can injure your knees. Instead, sit in Virasana on a block or other firm prop for a few minutes each day, and all four parts of the quads will gradually stretch out. Over time, you’ll be able to reduce the size of your prop until eventually you’ll be able to sit comfortably on the floor between your heels.

To further protect your knees, make sure your feet and toes point straight back behind you and not out to the sides. Also, while you’re kneeling before you sit, dig the fingertips of each hand deep into the back of the knee, pull and hold the flesh of the calf straight back toward the heel, and then move your fingers out as you sit down. Some people find it helpful to gently pull the calf flesh slightly out toward the little-toe side as they pull it back. This rearranging of the calf seems to open a little more space inside the knee and helps avoid undue twisting of the joint.

A tight RF can also cause problems for the lower back by limiting full extension at the hips. If your RF is tight and short, even sitting down on a block near your heels takes up any slack the muscle has to offer. As you move to lie back, the muscle can’t lengthen any more, and your pelvis will be stuck in a forward tilt. That places your lower back in an exaggerated and uncomfortable arch. Worse still, if one RF is shorter than the other, just one side of the pelvis will tilt forward, causing the pelvis to twist in relation to the spine and knees. This can strain the knees, sacroiliac joints, and lower back.

See also Ask the Expert: Which Yoga Poses Prevent Lower-Back Pain?

How to Effectively Stretch the Rectus Femoris

A good solution is to balance your stretching between the fronts and backs of your legs. If you’re the proud owner of tight, short RF muscles, be sure to stretch them just as frequently as you do your hamstrings. You’ll stretch the RF most effectively if you work on one side at a time, because the muscle is tough (containing lots of gristly connective tissue) and potentially strong. When you try to stretch the left and right together in poses like Supta Virasana or Bhekasana (Frog Pose), they will—like two mischievous kids—simply overpower the stretch, causing your back to overarch.

To get an effective RF stretch, you’ll need to flex the knee while you extend the hip in a position you can hold for one to two minutes. Ardha Bhekasana (Half Frog Pose) is a good way to stretch the RFs one at a time. Lie face-down with your shoulders in line with your hips and your knees three to four inches apart, bend your right knee and lift your right foot toward your buttocks. Use your hand or a strap to catch your foot, and before you pull on the foot, press your pubic bone into the floor, eliminating any gap between the front of your hip and the floor. Then, maintaining the three- to four-inch spread between your knees, gradually pull your heel toward the outer edge of your buttock (not the tailbone). Repeat on the other side. Remember, don’t force: Pain in your knee or lower back is never a good thing, and muscle pain can cause the muscle to contract and resist the stretch.

See also Kathryn Budig Challenge Pose: Tipsy Frog

You can also work on your RF muscles at a wall. Start on your hands and knees facing away from the wall, with your feet touching it. Place one shin on the wall, perpendicular to the floor, foot pointing up, and the knee within two to three inches of the wall with plenty of padding beneath it. Now bring the other foot forward to stand flat on the floor a couple of feet from the wall, and you’ll be in a modified lunge.

Next, put your hands on two yoga blocks or a chair seat to support yourself as you gradually move your tailbone down and away from the wall and into a deeper lunge. As the RF stretches and gradually lengthens, gently and slowly lift the hips, chest, and torso back toward the wall. If your lower back starts to hurt, ease off.

See also Plug Into the Wall + Recharge: 4 Soothing Restorative Poses

As you work over the weeks and months to lengthen the fronts of your thighs, come back to Supta Virasana from time to time to see whether you’re ready to practice it comfortably. You may find that it helps to start with a bolster or stack of folded blankets under your back and head. In the meantime, you’ll have an opportunity to bring yoga philosophy to life: By practicing patience and compassion, you’ll learn to breathe and relax into resistance and to persist in the face of a challenge that can’t be instantly resolved.

See also Give Yourself Props in Hero Pose


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Final trial results confirm Ebola vaccine provides high protection against disease


Final trial results confirm experimental Ebola vaccine, rVSV-ZEBOV, provides high protection against the disease.

“These compelling results show that when the next Ebola outbreak hits, we will not be defenceless,” said Dr Marie-Paule Kieny, WHO’s Assistant Director-General for Health Systems and Innovation, and the study’s lead author.

The trial was led by WHO, together with Guinea’s Ministry of Health in collaboration with other international partners

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2016/ebola-vaccine-results/en/

Final trial results confirm Ebola vaccine provides high protection against disease

News release

An experimental Ebola vaccine was highly protective against the deadly virus in a major trial in Guinea, according to results published today in The Lancet. The vaccine is the first to prevent infection from one of the most lethal known pathogens, and the findings add weight to early trial results published last year.

The vaccine, called rVSV-ZEBOV, was studied in a trial involving 11 841 people in Guinea during 2015. Among the 5837 people who received the vaccine, no Ebola cases were recorded 10 days or more after vaccination. In comparison, there were 23 cases 10 days or more after vaccination among those who did not receive the vaccine.

The trial was led by WHO, together with Guinea’s Ministry of Health, Medecins sans Frontieres and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, in collaboration with other international partners.

“While these compelling results come too late for those who lost their lives during West Africa’s Ebola epidemic, they show that when the next Ebola outbreak hits, we will not be defenceless," said Dr Marie-Paule Kieny, WHO’s Assistant Director-General for Health Systems and Innovation, and the study’s lead author.

The vaccine’s manufacturer, Merck, Sharpe & Dohme, this year received Breakthrough Therapy Designation from the United States Food and Drug Administration and PRIME status from the European Medicines Agency, enabling faster regulatory review of the vaccine once it is submitted.

Since Ebola virus was first identified in 1976, sporadic outbreaks have been reported in Africa. But the 2013–2016 West African Ebola outbreak, which resulted in more than 11 300 deaths, highlighted the need for a vaccine.

The trial took place in the coastal region of Basse-Guinée, the area of Guinea still experiencing new Ebola cases when the trial started in 2015. The trial used an innovative design, a so-called “ring vaccination” approach – the same method used to eradicate small pox.

When a new Ebola case was diagnosed, the research team traced all people who may have been in contact with that case within the previous 3 weeks, such as people who lived in the same household, were visited by the patient, or were in close contact with the patient, their clothes or linen, as well as certain “contacts of contacts”. A total of 117 clusters (or “rings") were identified, each made up of an average of 80 people.

Initially, rings were randomised to receive the vaccine either immediately or after a 3-week delay, and only adults over 18 years were offered the vaccine. After interim results were published showing the vaccine’s efficacy, all rings were offered the vaccine immediately and the trial was also opened to children older than 6 years.

In addition to showing high efficacy among those vaccinated, the trial also shows that unvaccinated people in the rings were indirectly protected from Ebola virus through the ring vaccination approach (so called “herd immunity"). However, the authors note that the trial was not designed to measure this effect, so more research will be needed.

“Ebola left a devastating legacy in our country. We are proud that we have been able to contribute to developing a vaccine that will prevent other nations from enduring what we endured," said Dr KeÏta Sakoba, Coordinator of the Ebola Response and Director of the National Agency for Health Security in Guinea.

To assess safety, people who received the vaccine were observed for 30 minutes after vaccination, and at repeated home visits up to 12 weeks later. Approximately half reported mild symptoms soon after vaccination, including headache, fatigue and muscle pain but recovered within days without long-term effects. Two serious adverse events were judged to be related to vaccination (a febrile reaction and one anaphylaxis) and one was judged to be possibly related (influenza-like illness). All three recovered without any long term effects.

It was not possible to collect biological samples from people who received the vaccine in order to analyse their immune response. Other studies are looking at the immune response to the vaccine including one conducted in parallel to the ring trial among frontline Ebola workers in Guinea.

“This both historical and innovative trial was made possible thanks to exemplary international collaboration and coordination, the contribution of many experts worldwide, and strong local involvement," said Dr John-Arne Røttingen, specialist director at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, and the chairman of the study steering group.

In January, GAVI, the Vaccine Alliance provided US$5 million to Merck towards the future procurement of the vaccine once it is approved, prequalified and recommended by WHO. As part of this agreement, Merck committed to ensure that 300 000 doses of the vaccine are available for emergency use in the interim, and to submit the vaccine for licensure by the end of 2017. Merck has also submitted the vaccine to WHO’s Emergency Use and Assessment Listing procedure, a mechanism through which experimental vaccines, medicines and diagnostics can be made available for use prior to formal licensure.

Additional studies are ongoing to provide more data on the safety of the vaccine in children and other vulnerable populations such as people with HIV. In case of Ebola flare-ups prior to approval, access to the vaccine is being made available through a procedure called “compassionate use” that enables use of the vaccine after informed consent. Merck and WHO’s partners are working to compile data to support license applications.

The rapid development of rVSV-EBOV contributed to the development of WHO’s R&D Blueprint, a global strategy to fast-track the development of effective tests, vaccines and medicines during epidemics.

Notes to editors

The rVSV-ZEBOV trial is funded by WHO, with support from the Wellcome Trust; the UK Government through the Department for International Development; the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs; the Norwegian Institute of Public Health through the Research Council of Norway,; the Canadian Government through the Public Health Agency of Canada, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the International Development Research Centre, and the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development; and Médecins Sans Frontières.

The trial team includes experts from The University of Bern, the University of Florida, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Public Health England, the European Mobile Laboratories among others. The trial was designed by a group of experts including the late Professor Donald A. Henderson of John Hopkins University, who led the WHO smallpox eradication effort by using the ring vaccination strategy.

rVSV-ZEBOV was developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada. The vaccine was licensed to NewLink Genetics, who in turn licensed it to Merck & Co. The vaccine works by replacing a gene from a harmless virus known as vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) with a gene encoding an Ebola virus surface protein. The vaccine does not contain any live Ebola virus. Earlier trials have shown the vaccine to be protective in animals, and be safe and produce an immune response in humans.

Analysis only included cases occurring 10 days after receiving the vaccine to account for the incubation period of the Ebola virus.

Media contact

Tarik Jašarević
WHO Department of Communications
Mobile: +41 79 367 6214
Email: jasarevict@who.int

 

1021 Gallery House by Craig Steere Architects


http://www.caandesign.com/1021-gallery-house-by-craig-steere-architects/

1021 Gallery House by Craig Steere Architects

Architects: Craig Steere Architects
Location: PerthWestern Australia, Australia
Year: 2015
Photo courtesy: Jack Lovel
Description:

Situated on a beautiful site on The Avenue in Nedlands, disregarding the Swan River in Perth’s western rural areas, this house has been intended to react to the requirements of a developing gang. The building is divided into two unmistakable structure shapes arranged around a focal yard. The section structure houses the primary living regions to the ground floor and the expert suite upstairs, with both levels getting to waterway sees. The two structures are joined by means of a transitional display space that suits an expansive kitchen and living spaces that open onto the focal yard and swimming pool. The back structure was intended to suit four high school children, giving them an autonomous living zone, whilst as yet keeping up visual and physical associations with the fundamental house spaces.

1021-Gallery-House-by-Craig-Steere-Architects-01

The habitation has a particular contemporary expression with clean lines, cubic structures and an emotional straight pergola structure that stretches out through the houses and underscores the relationship between the three unmistakable spaces. A basic palette of materials has been chosen including grayish rendered divider ranges, stone, timber and zinc cladding, supplementing the vigorous frame and accomplishing a low-upkeep outline. This house has been intended to accomplish a 6 star vitality effective rating with the utilization of aloof sun powered configuration standards and the cautious determination of materials and innovations all through the house.

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Thank you for reading this article!

 

Gasparbonta designed a contemporary two bedroom apartment in Budapest


http://www.caandesign.com/gasparbonta-designed-contemporary-two-bedroom-apartment-budapest/

Gasparbonta designed a contemporary two bedroom apartment in Budapest

Architects: Gasparbonta
Location: Budapest, Hungary
Year: 2016
Photo courtesy: Bálint Jaksa
Description:

“STUDIO LOFT is a delicate flat in downtown Budapest. Originally a studio of a well-known Hungarian painter, this flat has all the right features to be a contemporary loft home. The huge central space which contains the kitchen and the living room is accompanied by two bedrooms with separate bathrooms each and a small, invisible storage space.

gasparbonta-designed-contemporary-two-bedroom-apartment-budapest-01

Naturally, the visually most engaging part is the enormous window in the central space, which is almost 4 by 4 meters (13 by 13 feet). The flat happens to be located on a corner of Budapest’s central park area, Városliget, which is currently being transformed into a multi-layered cultural and recreational park (the Liget Budapest project).

gasparbonta-designed-contemporary-two-bedroom-apartment-budapest-02

The interior design concept is based on using the existing industrial features and combine them with clear geometry, raw and honest materials, like iron, concrete and wood to create a smooth, airy, empty space. Then add some colorful furniture and art pieces and finally, add some unique lighting solutions, to perfect the visual consistency.”

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Thank you for reading this article!

 

A&M contemporary, bright, single family house is located in Sydney by Marston Architects


http://www.caandesign.com/contemporary-bright-single-family-house-located-sydney-marston-architects/

A&M contemporary, bright, single family house is located in Sydney by Marston Architects

Architects: Marston Architects
Location: Sydney, Australia
Year: 2015
Photo courtesy: Katherine Lu
Description:

“Conceptually, the A&M Houses have been an experiment in drawing a relationship and balance between a reduced footprint, comfortable living and maximised amenity.

contemporary-bright-single-family-house-located-sydney-marston-architects-01

The undulation of the roof line and the north facing skylights open up the narrow volumes to the sky above promoting the feeling of abundance of space. The detailing of large openings and the continuation of the limestone flooring into the courtyard spaces aims to create generous and seamless connections to the outdoors, visually expanding the constricted floor-plate. Zinc cladding and waxed stucco walls contribute to the material palette and respond to the client’s ‘no-maintenance’ brief and the site’s close proxiity to the beach as no painting is required – ever!.

contemporary-bright-single-family-house-located-sydney-marston-architects-02

Inhabitants of the A&M houses are encouraged to modify and adapt spaces to facilitate maximum amenity in both an environmental and social sense. The use of sliding wall panels in the form of timber screens, frosted glass and linen curtains eliminate the need for fixed swing doors and allows each space to open up or close off according to visual and acoustic privacy needs.

contemporary-bright-single-family-house-located-sydney-marston-architects-03

Central to the material selection was the requirement to eliminate future maintenance. Anodised aluminium windows and internally waxed walls have a higher initial cost to install, however will be a more cost effective outcome in the longer term. Sustainability is at the core of the project. A smaller footprint not only generally requires less energy in the manufacture of the components but also the running costs of the building. The house is not air-conditioned and the tiled floors are conditioned with hydronic heating. All windows are double glazed and have external electrically controlled blinds to allow the user to control comfort.

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Half the size of a typical new house, the A&M houses aim to provide a modest floor plate without compromising liveability.”

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Thank you for reading this article!

 

Brown brick family house with contrasting modern sharp lines and vintage furniture


http://www.caandesign.com/brown-brick-family-house-contrasting-modern-sharp-lines-vintage-furniture/

Brown brick family house with contrasting modern sharp lines and vintage furniture

Architects: extrArchitecture
Location: Westbridge Road, London, England
Year: 2015
Photo courtesy: Barbara Corsico
Description:

“Located in the Westbridge Road Conservation Area in Battersea by the River Thames, the house is part of a group of brown brick cottages, dated circa 1840, originally with a flat roof at the rear and sixteen pane sash windows.

The final design of the house has been achieved in three different stages spread in the past 10 years and completed in May 2015.

The main challenge – not mentioning digging a 300 cubic metre (10,594 cubic foot) basement in close proximity to the river – was to create a contemporary design capable of merging the different phases of construction without appearing to be a mish-mash of materials and styles.

The first impact the house makes is one of surprise: a meticulous conservative restoration to the front of the house leads into a modern open plan interior with sharp lines softened by a French honey-colour limestone floor and antique family furniture. This approach of contrasting modern sharp lines with warm finishes and vintage furniture is often used by extrArchitecture in residential projects to avoid the aseptic white box effect.

The Ground Floor respects Modern Architecture’s open space rules. The different zones and functions are defined by furniture but merging one into the other. The bespoke ten metre (thirty-three foot) long piece of furniture in white matt lacquered Betacryl forms the kitchen workspace which then transforms itself into a console for the dining space and a cabinet and bookshelves for the living area.

Super-slim sliding full height glass doors create the in-out connection with the garden to be enjoyed all year round. The studio, a wooden volume with green roof in the back garden, optically doubles up the house.

Every detail has been focused on accentuating height and light. Five metres (sixteen feet) height space between dining and living zone distract the attention from the cottage’s traditional low ceilings and creates a fluid connection between the floors. The extensive use of glass, open tread staircase, skylight and white walls fills the house with light in any season.

The basement with its three metre (ten foot) ceiling height, tall doors and light-well with plants is completely integrated into the house.

A meticulous study has been done on bespoke storage to avoid the natural clutter produced in a family house and to give space and freedom to each member of the family and guests.”

Thank you for reading this article!

 

Lamble Modern Beach House with 270˚ Views of the Ocean by Smart Design Studio


http://www.caandesign.com/lamble-modern-beach-house-with-270%CB%9A-views-of-the-ocean-by-smart-design-studio/

Lamble Modern Beach House with 270˚ Views of the Ocean by Smart Design Studio

Architects: Smart Design Studio
Location: New South Wales, Australia
Year: 2013
Photo courtesy: Sharrin Rees
Description:

This house on the south shoreline of New South Wales was planned as one of a couple of present day shoreline houses involving a greenfield site neglecting excellent Gerringong shoreline. The site is a piece of another area discharge on the edge of a languid beach front town. From its lifted position, the house appreciates 270˚ perspectives of the sea, contiguous headland and evergreen hinterland past, which shape some piece of the Great Dividing Range. The setting is stunning. The outline intentionally tested nearby arranging procurements, which entirely directed how to design the building’s rooms inside of the site.

Lamble Modern Beach House with 270 Views of the Ocean by Smart Design Studio-01

We decided to take advantage of the perspectives and in addition the sunny and ensured northern viewpoint by finding the living and resting spaces on that side. This consigned the administration rooms including the bathrooms, clothing and carport toward the south. Shockingly, this sensible methodology brought about the neighborhood committee declining the first improvement application, which was later acknowledged accomplished through an offer and minor adjustments.

Lamble Modern Beach House with 270 Views of the Ocean by Smart Design Studio-02

Notwithstanding turning around the chamber’s arranging manages, we split the ordinary locating so as to arrange design parlor, second kitchen and main room upstairs, where the perspectives are best. First floor, the primary kitchen, eating, family room and different rooms open up toward the north and the mountains toward the west. The rooms’ majority open onto liberal outside spaces, situated on diverse sides of the house, guaranteeing security from the perpetually changing and solid winds. In this way taking signals from the beachside area, to make a weekender set up for easygoing exciting.

Lamble Modern Beach House with 270 Views of the Ocean by Smart Design Studio-03

Likewise with the vast majority of our undertakings, we received a key Smart Design Studio arranging standard, to minimize dependence on entryways, but instead let space stream around centers of joinery and continuous sharp edge dividers. The structure is greatly straightforward and the veneer has an exceptionally sure way to deal with strong and void. Vast dividers of glass on the upper floor and profound shaded patios are managed by the liberal cantilever rooftop. These float over the cedar-clad “box” underneath, which has either profound uncovers or timber movable louvers to temper the earth.

Lamble Modern Beach House with 270 Views of the Ocean by Smart Design Studio-04

Actually, the utilization of glass and strong identifies with the rooms contained inside, where more private spaces are more secured than the more open regions. The timber cladding, an exemplary shoreline house material, folds to make a strong balustrade to further enhance security. With time, the solid beach front light will bring about the timber to blur like a bit of driftwood, and the house will subside into the cruel scene. The greenery enclosure has been planted in an inferior beach front style, utilizing species from the prompt surroundings, and will develop and advance after some time.

Lamble Modern Beach House with 270 Views of the Ocean by Smart Design Studio-05

That timber then amplifies inwards and turns out to be an insides’ piece, through divider cladding in key territories, limed oak joinery and darkened components, for example, the stair, to further obscure within’s relationship and out. This is supplemented with dim substantial organization vitrified tiles all through and fresh white dividers, chiseling an impartial base for craftsmanship and the regularly evolving environment. The solid regular light permits sun and shade to vitalize the structural engineering, making the house piece of the perpetually changing landscape of the sea.

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Graphite Penthouse in Kiev by Denis Rakaev


http://www.caandesign.com/graphite-penthouse-in-kiev-by-denis-rakaev/

Graphite Penthouse in Kiev by Denis Rakaev

Architects: Denis Rakaev
Location: Kiev, Ukraine
Year: 2014
Area: 1,227 sqft
Photo courtesy: Andrey Avdeenko

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What happens to economies when education levels increase?


https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/03/what-happens-to-economies-when-education-levels-increase?utm_content=bufferf31de&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

What happens to economies when education levels increase?

This article is published in collaboration with VoxEU.
Students sit for an exam at the French Louis Pasteur Lycee in Strasbourg, June 18, 2012. REUTERS/Vincent Kessle

Students sit for an exam.
Image: REUTERS/Vincent Kessle
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Published
Tuesday 1 March 2016
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For at least the past one 100 years, the growth of industrialised economies has been remarkably balanced; output per worker has increased at a roughly constant rate, while the capital-output ratio, the real return on capital, and the shares of capital and labour in national income have remained fairly constant (Kaldor 1961, Jones 2015). Understanding why economies exhibit balanced growth is important for policymakers interested in how new technologies and changing institutions will affect long-run economic performance and the division of income between capital and labour. In recent work (Grossman et al. 2016), we study the causes of balanced growth and argue that it results from schooling levels increasing over time. This suggests investment in education has a crucial, but previously overlooked role in shaping long-run growth dynamics.

The origins of balanced growth: A puzzle

In the neoclassical growth model where output is produced using capital and labour, the conditions under which a balanced growth path exists are well known (Uzawa 1961). Either the elasticity of substitution between capital and labour must equal one, or technological change must augment the productivity of labour but not of capital. For 50 years, growth economists have focused their attention on production technologies that satisfy at least one of these conditions.

But there is a problem. The size of the elasticity of substitution between capital and labour is much debated, but the balance of evidence suggests it is well below one. Reviewing firm-level estimates of this elasticity, Chirinko (2008) concludes that “the weight of the evidence suggests a value of [the elasticity of substitution] in the range of 0.4 to 0.6”. In addition, the relative price of capital has fallen over time (Gordon 1990, Greenwood et al. 1997, Cummins and Violante 2002). Figure 1 shows that between 1947 and 2013 the relative price of investment goods fell at around 2% per year, which suggests capital-augmenting technical change has occurred. Taken together these observations imply neither of the Uzawa conditions for balanced growth hold empirically.

Figure 1. US relative price of equipment, 1947-2013

Source: Federal Reserve Bank Economic Data (FRED), Series PIRIC and PERIC.

Schooling: A possible solution

Figure 2 shows average years of schooling measured at age 30 for all cohorts of native American workers born between 1876 and 1982. Clearly, schooling has been rising over time. Perhaps investment in education provides a way to square balanced growth with the failure of the Uzawa conditions. To explore this possibility, we extend the neoclassical growth model by allowing output to depend not only on capital and labour, but also on the economy’s education level. The usual formulation where labour and schooling can be combined into a single ‘human capital’ input, as assumed in the Uzawa-Lucas growth model (Uzawa 1965, Lucas 1988), does not solve the puzzle. However, under the assumption that schooling rises over time we find that balanced growth can occur even without the Uzawa conditions holding, but only if capital accumulation raises the marginal product of schooling relative to the marginal product of labour. Thus, balanced growth requires the production technology to exhibit a form of capital-skill complementarity.

Figure 2. US education by birth cohort, 1876-1982

Source: Goldin and Katz (2007) and additional data from Lawrence Katz.

Balanced growth with endogenous schooling

The fact that a balanced growth path can exist when schooling rises over time does not mean it will exist in a market economy where individuals make optimal schooling decisions. To understand the consequences of optimising behaviour we study the equilibrium dynamics of three competitive economies where the production technology depends on capital, labour, and schooling and the elasticity of substitution between capital and labour is less than one:

A ‘time-in-school’ economy where each individual only lives for an instant and chooses what fraction of her lifetime to devote to schooling. Workers that spend longer in school are more productive when they join the labour force.A ‘manager-worker’ economy where again individuals only live for an instant, but education is a discrete choice and educated individuals become managers while all other individuals are workers. In this economy aggregate output depends on capital and the supplies of skilled managers and unskilled workers, as in Krusellet al.(2000).A more realistic ‘overlapping generations’ economy where successive cohorts of individuals live for a finite amount of time and choose how many years to spend in school before joining the workforce.

For each of these economies we characterise a class of production functions for which the economy will exhibit balanced growth. Balanced growth occurs because, in equilibrium, capital accumulation raises the returns to education and this causes schooling to increase at exactly the rate needed to offset the effect of capital-augmenting technical change on capital’s share of income.

On the balanced growth path, growth in output per capita results from both capital-augmenting and labour-augmenting technical change, and the division of income between capital and labour is constant. The overlapping generations model is also consistent with many other features of the US experience. In particular, years of schooling by birth cohort rises linearly over time as seen empirically in Figure 2, the returns to schooling satisfy a Mincer-like wage equation and the labour force participation rate declines with time.

Capital’s share of income

There is some evidence that in recent years, growth in the US and elsewhere has slowed, while capital’s share of income has risen (Elsby et al. 2013, Karabarbounis and Neiman 2014). To understand the relationship between the rate of technical change and capital’s steady state income share, we calibrate the balanced growth path of the overlapping generations model. Interestingly, we find that a decline in the rate of technical change leads to both a growth slowdown and an increase in capital’s share of income. This illustrates how changes in the economic environment may affect both long-run economic performance and the division of income between capital and labour.

Conclusions

The observation that the US and many other industrialised economies have experienced balanced growth over long periods is a key fact that informs our understanding of the growth process. Yet the Uzawa conditions for balanced growth are inconsistent with empirical findings. We suggest a simple and compelling way to resolve this problem. When capital and schooling are sufficiently complementary, increases in schooling offset the effect of capital deepening on the capital share and ensure growth remains balanced. Our research not only highlights the importance of education for growth, but also has novel implications for how the aggregate production function should be specified and how capital accumulation affects inequality. We hope that future research will shed further light on these questions.

References

Chirinko, R S (2008), “The Long and the Short of It,” Journal of Macroeconomics 30(2), 671-86.

Cummins, J and G L Violante (2002), “Investment-Specific Technical Change in the US (1947-2000): Measurement and Macroeconomic Consequences,” Review of Economic Dynamics 5(2), 243-84.

Elsby, M W L, B Hobijn, and S Aysegul (2013), “The Decline of the U.S. Labor Share,” Brookings Papers on Economic Activity 47(2), 1-63.

Goldin, C and F L Katz (2007), “Long-Run Changes in the Wage Structure: Narrowing, Widening, and Polarization,” Brookings Papers on Economic Activity 38(2), 135-68.

Gordon, R J (1990), The Measurement of Durable Goods Prices, Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Greenwood, J, Z Hercovitz, and P Krusell (1997), “Long-Run Implications of Investment-Specific Technological Change,” American Economic Review 87(3), 342-62.

Grossman, G M, E Helpman, E Oberfield and T Sampson (2016), “Balanced Growth Despite Uzawa,” CEPR Discussion Paper 11063.

Jones, C I (2015), “The Facts of Economic Growth,” in preparation for the Handbook of Macroeconomics.

Kaldor, N (1961),“Capital Accumulation and Economic Growth,” in F A Lutz and D C Hague, eds.,The Theory of Capital, New York: St. Martins Press.

Karabarbounis, L and B Neiman (2014), “The Global Decline of the Labor Share,” Quarterly Journal of Economics 129(1), 61-103.

Krusell, P, L E Ohanian, R- R José-Victor and G L Violante (2000), “Capital-Skill Complementarity and Inequality: A Macroeconomic Analysis,” Econometrica 68(5), 1029-63.

Lucas, R E Jr (1988), “On the Mechanics of Economic Development,” Journal of Monetary Economics 22(1), 3-47.

Uzawa, H (1961), “Neutral Inventions and the Stability of Growth Equilibrium,” Review of Economic Studies 28(2), 117-24.

Uzawa, H (1965), “Optimal Technical Change in an Aggregate Model of Economic Growth,”International Economic Review 6(1), 18-31.

Written by

Gene M. Grossman,

This article is published in collaboration with VoxEU.

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

 

Gasparbonta designed a contemporary two bedroom apartment in Budapest


http://www.caandesign.com/gasparbonta-designed-contemporary-two-bedroom-apartment-budapest/

Gasparbonta designed a contemporary two bedroom apartment in Budapest

Architects: Gasparbonta
Location: Budapest, Hungary
Year: 2016
Photo courtesy: Bálint Jaksa
Description:

“STUDIO LOFT is a delicate flat in downtown Budapest. Originally a studio of a well-known Hungarian painter, this flat has all the right features to be a contemporary loft home. The huge central space which contains the kitchen and the living room is accompanied by two bedrooms with separate bathrooms each and a small, invisible storage space.

gasparbonta-designed-contemporary-two-bedroom-apartment-budapest-01

Naturally, the visually most engaging part is the enormous window in the central space, which is almost 4 by 4 meters (13 by 13 feet). The flat happens to be located on a corner of Budapest’s central park area, Városliget, which is currently being transformed into a multi-layered cultural and recreational park (the Liget Budapest project).

gasparbonta-designed-contemporary-two-bedroom-apartment-budapest-02

The interior design concept is based on using the existing industrial features and combine them with clear geometry, raw and honest materials, like iron, concrete and wood to create a smooth, airy, empty space. Then add some colorful furniture and art pieces and finally, add some unique lighting solutions, to perfect the visual consistency.”

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Dance, otherwise we are lost.


“Dansez, sinon nous sommes perdus." – Pina Baush

" Dance, otherwise we are lost."-PINA BAUSH

Photography: Vadim Stein photography with Alisa Velerieva Uzunova

20161224-d-003-photography-vadim-stein-photography

There is a third pole on earth, and it’s melting quickly


https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/08/the-third-pole-what-it-is-and-how-it-could-affect-the-lives-of-a-billion-people?utm_content=buffer0ed58&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

There is a third pole on earth, and it’s melting quickly

A yak herder loads supplies onto his animals at the foot of the world's highest mountain Mount Everest, also known as Qomolangma, in the Tibet Autonomous Region May 6, 2008. An envoy of the Dalai Lama said on Tuesday that one-day talks with China on the unrest in Tibet had been "a good first step" and that the two sides would meet again after he reports back to the exiled spiritual leader. The unrest, the most serious challenge to Chinese rule in the mountainous region for nearly two decades, prompted anti-China protests around the world that disrupted the international leg of the torch relay for the Beijing Olympics and led to calls for Western leaders to boycott the August Games.

Temperatures in the Third Pole region have increased by 1.5 degrees – more than double the global average.
Image: REUTERS/David Gray
Written by
Alex GraySenior Writer, Formative Content
Published
Thursday 18 August 2016
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When we think of the world’s polar regions, only two usually spring to mind – the North and South. However, there is a region to the south of China and the north of India that is known as the “Third Pole”.

That’s because it is the third largest area of frozen water on the planet. Although much smaller than its north and south counterparts, it is still enormous, covering 100,000 square kilometres with some 46,000 glaciers.

Scientists conducting research in the area have warned of disturbing global warming trends, and how, if they continue, they could affect the lives of 1.3 billion people.

The importance of the Third Pole

What happens to ice in the polar regions is taken as clear evidence of climate change. When the ice melts, we know that the planet is warming up.

The Earth’s north and south extremities are crucial for regulating the climate, and at the same time are particularly sensitive to global warming. The Third Pole, because it is high above sea level, is also sensitive to changes in temperatures.

It also powers life for many thousands of miles. It is estimated that the water that flows from the Third Pole supports 120 million people directly through irrigation systems, and a total of 1.3 billion indirectly through river basins in China, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Afghanistan. That’s nearly one fifth of the world’s population.

It is remote – the region encompasses the Himalaya-Hindu Kush mountain ranges and the Tibetan Plateau – but 10 of Asia’s largest rivers begin here, including the Yellow river and Yangtze river in China, the Irrawaddy river in Myanmar, the Ganges, which flows through India and Bangladesh, and the trans-boundary Mekong river.

Image: International Water Security Network

The impact of climate change

Australian TV company ABC was recently invited to visit one of the remote research stations in the Third Pole by lead researcher, Professor Qin Xiang. Scientists have been gathering data from this remote area for over 50 years, and recent findings are disturbing. Among them, the fact that temperatures there have increased by 1.5 degrees – more than double the global average.

Since 2005, the rate at which the Third Pole’s glaciers are melting has almost doubled. Research has also found that more than 500 small glaciers have disappeared altogether and the biggest ones are shrinking rapidly.

But global warming is not the only reason that the team found for the melting ice. Dust and pollution from car exhausts and coal burners is settling on the ice, causing it to absorb the rays of the sun, rather than reflect them away.

Studying this area is difficult – scientists are hampered by harsh weather conditions and political instability – but it is crucial for understanding the impact of global warming as a whole.

The Third Pole Environment (TPE) is an international research program that launched in 2009 and focuses on the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding mountain ranges.

Scientists who gathered at the most recent TPE Workshop heard how the most pressing issue was: “The continuity of…freshwater (both in terms of quantity and quality) in the future is the main concern.”

The effects will be felt much further than the area immediately surrounding the Third Pole. The continuous glacier melting will be catastrophic for the 1.3 billion people who depend on its water.

While initially more water is expected to pour into river basins, causing flooding, eventually that will dry up, resulting in drought and desertification.

In the end, only a reduction in black soot emissions, in addition to a reduction in greenhouse gases, will prevent the glaciers in this region from disappearing further.

Have you read?

Written by

Alex Gray, Senior Writer, Formative Content

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

 

Open Shoulders, Bigger Backbends


http://www.yogajournal.com/article/practice-section/shoulder-saver/

Open Shoulders, Bigger Backbends

Do you ever wonder what you’ll find around the next corner? Maybe you’re curious about what’s beyond the bend while you’re hiking or what’s on the next block while you’re exploring an unfamiliar city. Or maybe you find yourself wondering what the next phase of your life will bring.

When it comes to backbending, Dwi Pada Viparita Dandasana (Two-Legged Inverted Staff Pose) is just around the corner from Urdhva Dhanurasana (Upward Bow Pose). But since it requires significantly more openness in the shoulders than Urdhva Dhanurasana, it often remains just out of view.

By using props, you can help prepare your shoulders for the flexion and external rotation that Viparita Dandasana requires. You might associate props with being a beginner, or you might think of them as a crutch. But when you learn to use props creatively, you’ll see that they can help reinforce certain actions that difficult poses require. In the case of Viparita Dandasana, they can help bridge the gap between where you are now and what lies ahead.

Action Plan

To do the required arm movements in Viparita Dandasana without straining your shoulders, you need to be able to externally rotate your arm bones while you flex them deeply (taking them up and slightly behind your head). These actions demand flexibility in the triceps and in the upper and middle fibers of the trapezius as well as openness all along your side body, including the latissimus dorsi.

The End Game

When the muscles around your shoulders are tight, it can be difficult to externally rotate and flex the arms to the degree needed. You’ll know you’re tight if your elbows tend to separate and splay. By using props to help you stretch and prepare your muscles, you’ll imprint the sensations of the actions, which will make it easier to access them in Viparita Dandasana. The aim is to work on opening your body until the final pose feels even and spacious, without strain.

Warm-Up

Even with props, Natarajasana (Lord of the Dance Pose) and Viparita Dandasana are challenging poses that require a thorough warm-up. In both poses you lengthen and stretch the front body while stabilizing and contracting the back body. Begin with 4 to 6 rounds of Surya Namaskar (Sun Salutation) with High and Low Lunges. Open your shoulders with Gomukhasana (Cow Face Pose) and Garudasana (Eagle Pose). Awaken the muscles of your trunk and ready your spine with a steady progression of backbends, including Salabhasana (Locust Pose), Bhujangasana (Cobra Pose), Dhanurasana (Bow Pose), Setu Bandha Sarvangasana (Bridge Pose), and Urdhva Dhanurasana. Practice each backbend 2 to 4 times and maintain each for 5 breaths or more.

Elbows-on-Chair Stretch

Propping: Elbows on a chair with a block between your hands.

Why This Works: This variation brings your arms into external rotation and flexion and mimics the arm position of the final pose. It stretches the triceps and the middle and upper fibers of the trapezius. The block keeps the upper arms and elbows in the correct position, which is shoulder-width apart.

How To: Fold your sticky mat and place it on the seat of a chair for padding. Set the back of the chair against a wall. Place a blanket under your knees to help cushion them. Kneel in front of the chair and place your elbows on the front edge of the seat (on the folded mat), shoulder-width apart. Hold a block between the base of your palms. Slowly walk your knees away from the chair until they are under your hips and your shoulders are parallel to the chair seat.

Bring your awareness to your abdomen, lower back, and hips. You may have a tendency to sink into your abdomen, allowing too much curve and compression in your lower back. To correct this—and to shift the desired opening to your shoulders—gently draw your navel toward your spine and lengthen your lower back.

With your pelvis and lower back neutral, you will feel a stretch in your shoulders and arms. Deepen this sensation by rooting your elbows downward into the chair and gently squeezing the block between your hands. Create the action of lengthening your elbows toward the wall and drawing the inner border of your shoulder blades toward your tailbone. These actions are subtle and won’t amount to much actual movement.

Breathe into the sides of your rib cage and feel the expansiveness of your upper body. After 8 to 10 breaths in the pose, walk your knees forward toward the chair. Once all of your weight is off your shoulders, sit back on your heels and lift your elbows off the chair.

Natarajasana (Lord of the Dance Pose)

Propping: A strap, made into the largest loop possible, around your lifted foot.

Why This Works: This pose reinforces the arm movements you’ll do in the final pose. It also prepares the lower body by stretching the hip flexors, thighs, and iliopsoas.

To get the most out of this pose, keep your elbows hugged in toward the midline of the pose. If you’re tight, the elbows will want to open out to the side. Resist this, even if you have to move your arm forward in space.

How To: Before you begin, a side note: Avoid allowing the strap loop to fit snugly around the foot in Natarajasana. By making the loop larger, you can eventually take your hand off the wall and have each hand hold a side of the strap to get more efficient, balanced leverage.

Stand next to a wall. With the strap in your right hand, place your left hand on the wall. Keeping your right arm low, reach back and loop the strap around your right foot. Bend your right knee and pull your right heel toward your sitting bone. Bend your right elbow and bring it forward and then up toward the ceiling until your elbow is next to your ear.

Deepen the actions. Tilt your pelvis forward as if you were doing a forward bend on your left leg. From there, contract your right hamstring muscles and lift your right thigh as high as it will go. Next, lift your chest. If you feel steady, take your left hand away from the wall and hold the strap with both hands, palms facing forward. Hug the elbows toward each other.

Finish the pose by walking one or both hands down the loop toward your right foot. Press your foot back against the strap as you reach your forearms toward the ceiling. Create an even degree of sensation throughout the backbend.

After 7 to 10 breaths, release the strap with your left hand and place the hand on the wall. Lower your right elbow forward and down—not out to the side—and let go of the strap. Pause for a moment before repeating the pose on your other side.

Dwi Pada Viparita Dandasana (Two-Legged Inverted Staff Pose)

Propping: Blocks under the feet. Elbows on a blanket or sticky mat.

Why This Works: Elevating the feet with blocks allows you to lift the pelvis and thighs higher, giving you more leverage to get on top of your elbows and head. A support underneath the elbows effectively lifts the floor up to you.

How To: In the full version of this pose, the legs are straight. We’ll practice the pose with bent knees to make it more accessible. It’s not recommended that you straighten the legs with this propping because it will put stress on your lower back. You must be able to press into Urdhva Dhanurasana on your own before trying any version of Viparita Dandasana.

Place two blocks against a wall, hip-width apart. Have a folded blanket or an extra rolled mat nearby, and lie face-up, feet toward the wall. Place your feet on the blocks and your sitting bones as close to the blocks as possible. Place the folded blanket or rolled sticky mat just behind you, touching the top of your head.

Place your hands next to your ears and press into Urdhva Dhanurasana. Bend your elbows, and lower the crown of your head to the floor so that your forehead is almost touching the support. (Note: If you don’t have the strength to lift into Urdhva Dhanurasana with your feet on the blocks, remove the blocks and try again with your feet on the floor.) Bring your hands into Headstand position: Place your right forearm on the floor, your right elbow on the blanket. Do the same thing with your left arm, and interlace your fingers behind your head. Press your elbows down and lift your shoulder blades away from your ears. Even though your head stays on the floor, the majority of your weight should be supported by the actions of your arms and shoulders.

After 5 to 8 breaths, place your hands next to your head and lift your head off the floor. Tuck your chin and lower yourself all the way down. Allow a few moments of stillness to feel the effects of practicing this pose.

Jason Crandell teaches alignment-based vinyasa yoga workshops and teacher trainings around the world.

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